Egg Free Cookies – paleo and low fodmap

Egg Free

These cookies are paleo, egg free, dairy free and can be made with a wide variety of sweeteners (maple syrup, honey, coconut sugar and erythritol have all be tested!). This recipe has minimal sweetener due to me trying to lower my sugar intake, but if you want to make them an extra treat you can add in a little extra sweetener and it won’t affect the recipe ( I have tested them with various levels of sweetener).

This recipe is a remake of one of my older recipes. Since discovering I can’t tolerate eggs, it’s been difficult to find recipes for most things as they always tend to contain egg – ugh! I don’t tolerate huge amounts of flaxseed and can’t handle chai seeds and these are the ingredients usually used in most egg free baking (doh!).

In place of the eggs I have used a gelatine egg which has worked out really well. Once the cookies have cooled down, they have a wonderful crunchy, crumbly texture. I haven’t yet tried making them vegan compliant but I would like to try, and I aim to use agar agar as a replacement for the gelatine. If anyone decides to try this before me – please let me know how you get on!

Other Recipes

For more sweet AIP and Low FODMAP treats check out my other recipes such as breakfast bars or chewy cookies.

If you are lucky enough to be able to eat eggs, then check out my original paleo cookie recipe or my crunchy paleo biscuits which are delicious (I tried them before I found out I couldn’t eat egg).
Whilst I have been testing these cookies to be egg free I have also made them in a range of flavours such as dates and chocolate, double chocolate chip, chocolate and pecans and plain with brazil nuts.

AIP compliant
To make these cookies AIP compliant you can use tigernut flour (i have tested them with tigernut flour). Omit the cacao powder and either use carbo powder or go without. You also need to omit the vanilla but could use either mace or cinnamon in its place (use 1 teaspoon). Good AIP fillings include dates, raisins, and figs.

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Egg Free Cookies - paleo and low fodmap
Course Sweets
Servings
Ingredients
Course Sweets
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Turn the oven on to 150’ C (300'F)
  2. Line a baking sheet with a silicon mat or greaseproof paper and lightly oil using the extra tablespoon of coconut oil.
  3. In a bowl combine the almond flour, cacao powder, coconut sugar (if using honey or maple syrup leave out), bicarb of soda, vanilla and salt. Stir to combine.
  4. Chop the nuts and add into the dry mixture. Chop the chocolate and place aside for now.
  5. In a sauce pan add the coconut oil, the coconut milk and if using maple syrup or honey, add in here. Turn on the heat very low to melt the ingredients and stir to combine.
  6. Turning off the heat, sprinkle the gelatine over the melted oil and immediately whisk to combine.
  7. Pour the liquid into the dry mix and stir to combine.
  8. Add the chopped chocolate into the mixture and stir once again to combine.
  9. Using a cookie cutter to shape, on the greaseproof paper press a heaped tablespoon of the mixture into the cutter and use your fingers to flatten out into the shape of the cutter. Lift the cutter carefully, leaving the shaped cookie behind. Allow two finger spaces between each cookie to allow for spreading.
  10. When all of the mixture has been used up place the baking tray in the middle of the oven and cook for 24 minutes.
  11. Once cooked turn off the oven and allow the cookies to remain in the oven for a good 20 minutes before fetching out and allowing to cool on a rack. As the cookies cool down they will firm up and develop a nice crunchy texture.
  12. Keep in an air tight container for up to 4 days.
Recipe Notes

Gelatine - Make sure you use the orange can if you are using Great Lakes gelatine. You want to use gelatine, the kind that gels, not collagen which doesn't act like a binding ingredient.

Sweetener - If you don't want to use coconut sugar, you can use maple syrup, honey, erythritol or any other kind of sweetener. If you want the cookies to be sweeter then you can add more into the mix. However, if you are following a low FODMAP diet then don't use more than 2 tablespoons of coconut sugar as large amounts are higher in FODMAPS.

Flours - I have made these cookies using tigernut flour as well as using half and half with almond flour.

Fillings - If you want to avoid chocolate or don't want to use nuts then you could use tigernuts, dates, dried fruit, or even carob drops.

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AIP & Low FODMAP Burgers

Finding an AIP Low FODMAP recipe for burgers is pretty much impossible but not anymore – yay! This recipe is egg-free, dairy free, gluten free, paleo, AIP and low FODMAP. They are really easy to make and can be frozen too.

If you want more details on the Low FODMAP diet or the Auto Immune Protocol, take a look here at my post The Low FODMAP diet – a basic guide or Autoimmune protocok – the basics.

Serving Suggestion

Serve these burgers with some salad leaves, sliced avocado, Low FODMAP / AIP coleslaw and roasted sweet potatoes for a great tasting dinner.

More AIP Low FODMAP Recipes

For more AIP and Low FODMAP recipes check out my posts Salmon fishcakes, Meatballs, Yuk Sung and Lamb Curry.

NON AIP Ingredients

For those of you are not AIP try adding in one tablespoon of ground black pepper and one teaspoon of mustard powder for an extra spice kick!

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AIP & Low FODMAP Burgers
Great tasting burgers that are full of flavour but without high FODMAPs and using all friendly AIP ingredients. Serve with salad, some coleslaw, roasted sweet potato and some avocado for a really satisfying dinner.
Course Main Dish
Cook Time 25 Minutes
Passive Time 10 Minutes
Servings
Burgers
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cook Time 25 Minutes
Passive Time 10 Minutes
Servings
Burgers
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180'c (350'F)
  2. In a bowl add all the spices, herbs and sugar. Stir to combine.
  3. Add the minced beef into the bowl with the spices etc and stir to combine.
  4. Using a burger press or your hands, shape the mixture into four burgers.
  5. Place the burgers on a baking sheet and cook for 25 mintues
  6. When cooked served with some salad, coleslaw and roasted sweet potatoes for a great tasting dinner.

AIP Breakfast Bars- low FODMAP, low carb with SIBO SCD, vegan and nut options

These AIP breakfast bars are Paleo, low FODMAP, low carb and can be adapted to be SIBO SCD and vegan compliant. They are similar to a Kellogs Nutrigrain bar except without the grains and refined sugar.

If you didnt want raisins/ sultanas and blueberries you can add other fillings in place of them them such as fresh cherries (not low FODMAP) or strawberries, figs, seeds, dried pineapple and banana or even chocolate chunks if you can tolerate cacao. I have made them with sundried banana and chocolate chunks before and they were just as delicious.

Variations

For a vegan option you can use agar-agar (1 tbsp will be enough) in place of the gelatine or guar gum (1 tbsp). Follow the same steps as you would the gelatine – whisking it with water before adding into the mixture.

Nut Option

If you tolerate nuts then you can use nut flours and or seed flour / butters. You can swap for the exact same amounts. If you use sunflower seeds, omit the baking soda otherwise the mixture will turn green! (Its not harmful, its just an alkali reaction between the soda and the sunflower seeds). I mostly make my bars using almond flour and hazelnut butter as I have successfully reintroduced these into my diet.

SIBO SCD

For SIBO SCD you will need to omit the bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) as its classed as “illegal” (in other words it’s on the “no” list!). It won’t made a huge difference to the bars as they don’t rise much during cooking.

Low Carb

If you wanted to reduce the carb count even further you can omit the honey entirely or you can use powdered erythritol or stevia instead. I would use the 30g of erythritol (based on my experience of using erythritol) but if you have a sweet tooth you may want to add a little bit extra.

Although I have called them breakfast bars they can be eaten as a snack or even a dessert. I like to heat mine up (in the microwave for 15 seconds) and serve with paleo ice cream. My favourite dairy free ice cream recipe is by Kelly from The Spunky Coconut. Its called Swiss Almond Dairy Free Ice Cream, but it can be made without the nuts/ nut milk. To make it, I use all coconut milk. Paired with a hot breakfast bar it makes quite a treat!!!

AIP Breakfast Bars

Servings 15 bars

Nutritional Information (per bar)

Total Carbs 10.6g
Fiber 2.4g
Net carbs 8.2g
Protein 2.8g
Fat 6.6g
Calories 104 Kcals

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AIP Breakfast Bars
These AIP breakfast bars are so versatile, you can make them with a range of fresh and dried fruit. Try swapping the raisins and sultanas for dried pineapple and banana for a tasty tropical twist!
Course Breakfast, Sweets
Cuisine English
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 26
Servings
Ingredients
Course Breakfast, Sweets
Cuisine English
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 26
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 160'c and line a baking tray with greaseproof paper. Use a little coconut oil to grease the paper as it helps the mixture from sticking to the paper once it cools!.
  2. In a bowl combine the tigernut flour, desiccated coconut, vanilla, salt, baking soda, saltanas, raisins, lemon juice, honey, coconut milk and nut butter. Stir thoroughly until everything has incorporated.
  3. Chop the dates into small pieces and add to the mixture, then stir once more to combine.
  4. In a jug add the gelatine (agar-agar or guar gum) then add the hot water, cold water and whisk immediately until its becomes white and frothy.
  5. Pour the gelatine mixture into the bowl with the tigernut flour mix and give everything one final stir, making sure everything has combined.
  6. Scoop the mixture into the baking dish and using your fingers or a spatula, press the mix into the tray.
  7. Take the blueberries and press one by one into the top of the mixture, dotting them about. Try not to press them into the edges of the mixture as they can go soggy making a mess when cutting the bars up.
  8. Place into the oven and allow to cook for 26 minutes or until the top has turned a golden brown in colour.
  9. Remove from the oven and turn out onto a cooling rack and remove the greaseproof paper carefully - leave to cool for 20 minutes.
  10. Once cooled cut into bars or squares and allow to cool fully before placing in a container in the fridge. Use greaseproof paper or foil to separate layers so the bars don't stick to one another.
  11. Serving Suggestion : Eat whilst warm (or reheat in the microwave for 15 seconds) and serve with Paleo Ice Cream!

Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (Cookies)

Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (cookies)

Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (cookies)

These biscuits (or cookies as those of you in the USA would refer to them) can be made paleo by using nut butter in place of the peanut butter. They can be made low FODMAP by using brown sugar or granulated sugar in place of the coconut sugar.

For a low carb / ketogenic version you will want to use erythritol or stevia to sweeten and use a nut flour in place of the buckwheat. If using erythritol I would suggest 60g and this is based on my experience with adapting paleo recipes. I dont really use stevia as I dislike it, but when I have used it, I stick to pure stevia with a reb of 97% (What’s Stevia Reb 97%?) and I use only 1/2 teaspoon. If you are used to working with stevia then go with you own recommendation.

Variations

Nut butter
The biscuits photographed were made with organic peanut butter. They CAN be made with ANY nut butter which will make them Paleo. I know that some paleo peeps do still eat peanut butter, but if you dont then hazelnut butter would be an awesome swap – especially if you can get some with some chunky pieces in it.

Chocolate Chips
If you don’t want to add chocolate chips then you can swap it for whatever you like – a good choice would be raisings, chewy banana pieces or even some dried cherries – oohhh yum!

Flours
After doing a bit of research it seems that buckwheat flour can be subbed with rice flour, banana flour or even any kind of nut flour. I haven’t yet tried these substitutions but I am mentioning them based on research of other recipes where these flours have been subbed for one another. In the past I have made recipes with almond flour and even tigernut flour in place of buckwheat and they worked out fine (I used the exact same amounts).

Baking Powder
Baking powder is not paleo, from what I have read its because it’s derived from grains (forgive me if I am wrong). But dont worry theres an easy paleo sub that you can do. For a paleo friendly baking powder you can use cream of tartar and bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) mixed together. The trick is to use 1/2 teaspoon of cream of tartar with 1/4 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda. I make up a big batch and keep it in a recycled glass jar.

Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (cookies)

Servings 16 cookies

Nutritional Information (per biscuit)

Total Carbs 17.5g
Fiber 2.1g
Net carbs 15.5g
Protein 4.8g
Fat 10.2g
Calories 173 Kcals

For a low carb version, using almond flour and 6og erythritol, based on 16 biscuits the nutritional information is as follows;

Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (cookies)

Servings 16 cookies

Nutritional Information (per biscuit)

Total Carbs 5.5g
Fiber 2.1g
Net carbs 3.4g
Protein 5.8g
Fat 16.4g
Calories 183 Kcals

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Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (Cookies)
These crunchy paleo biscuits are so delicious and have an amazing crunch to them which you don't often get with paleo baking. They are so versatile too, you can use dried fruit, nuts or even carob drops in place of the chocolate chunks.
Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (cookies)
Course Sweets
Cuisine English
Prep Time 10 min
Cook Time 25 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Course Sweets
Cuisine English
Prep Time 10 min
Cook Time 25 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Crunchy Paleo Biscuits (cookies)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180'C and line a large baking tray with a silicon mat or lightly oiled greaseproof paper.
  2. in a bowl using an electric whisk (or in a stand mixer) add the peanut butter, melted coconut oil and egg and whisk until combined,
  3. In a separate bowl add the buckwheat flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, vanilla and salt and stir until combined.
  4. Pour the liquid into the dry mixture and whisk until its all incorporated. Add in the chopped chocolate and continue to mix until the chocolate has been evenly distributed.
  5. If the mixture is a little bit sticky, you can add a little extra flour so that it's a little bit drier and easier to handle.
  6. Taking walnut sized pieces of the mixture, roll into a ball the flatten in the palm of your hand. Place on the lined baking sheet leaving about half an inch gap in betwwen to allow for spreading.
  7. Place in the oven near the top and allow to cook for 15 - 25 minutes. Cooking will vary depending on how your oven holds its heat. Ideally you want the cookies to start to turn brown around the edges.
  8. Once brown, remove from the oven and allow to cool on a wire rack. Allow to cool completely before munching as they firm up as they cool down.
  9. Keep in an airtight container for upto 3 days. If the weather is particularly hot you can keep the tub in the fridge.

Paleo Chewy Cookies – Low FODMAP, AIP & SIBO SCD

Elimination Diet Friendly

These cookies are paleo, Low FODMAP, Dairy free and Egg free. They can also be made AIP, SIBO SCD and ketogenic compliant (substitutes listed in ‘Recipe Notes’) – whoop!

You can find out more about these diets by clicking on the following links; the AIP diet, a Low FODMAP diet, a SIBO SCD and the Paleo diet.

These cookies have a wonderful chewy texture and only have a small amount of maple syrup in them. I used 3 medjool dates and just 30g of 80% dark chocolate for my fillings, but you could substitute with any other dried fruit, nuts, carob drops or even fresh fruit – use whatever suits your diet!

I have been following the AIP diet but have managed to re-introduce small amounts of nuts so I decided to make these cookies with almond flour. I have also made them with tigernut flour too and they turned out just as delicious. They may work well with cavassa flour or banana flour but I havent tried it – if anyone decides to give these flours a go, please let me know how you get on!

For low carb/ ketogenic dieters it’s good to know that you can still make these cookies with medjool dates. By subbing the maple syrup for a low carb sweetener, the cookies are reduced to just 5.3g Carbs (per cookie), with Fiber at 1.5g and Net Carbs at a low 3.7g.

Once made its best to keep these in the fridge so they keep fresh. However, as they don’t contain egg they will keep at room temperature but they may spoil after a few days if the weather is hot.

Paleo Chewy Cookies

Servings: 16 (Makes 6 individual fishcakes)

Nutritional Information (per Cookie)

Total Carbs 8.8g
Fiber 1.7g
Net Carbs 7.1g
Protein 2.8g
Fat 10.1g
Calories 131 Kcals

Paleo Chewy Cookies – Low Carb/ Ketogenic Version

Servings 16

Nutritional Information (per cookie)

Uses 2 tbsp extra coconut milk and 3 tbsp of erythritol
Total Carbs 5.3g
Fiber 1.5g
Net carbs 3.7g
Protein 2.8g
Fat 10.5g
Calories 121 Kcals

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Paleo Chewy Cookies - Low FODMAP AIP & SIBO SCD
These Paleo cookies are deliciously chewy and can be made with a variety of fillings. Chose from dried or fresh fruit, nuts, seeds, chocolate or carob drops!
Course Sweets
Cuisine English
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
Course Sweets
Cuisine English
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 180'c Using a silicon mat or baking paper, line a baking sheet and place on the side ready to place the cookies.
  2. If your coconut oil is hard, you will need to melt it until it's soft. You can do this by placing it in the microwave for 30 -60 seconds. Alternatively place the jar into a bowl of boiling water.
  3. In a large bowl add the wet ingredients - maple syrup (or honey), coconut oil, nut butter, coconut milk and lemon juice and whisk until fully combined.
  4. In a separate bowl add the dry ingredients - almond flour (or tigernut flour), bicarbonate of soda, cinnamon, ginger, vanilla and salt and stir to combine.
  5. In a jug add the gelatin and pour in 2 tbsp of cold water and 1 tbsp of boiling water then immediately whisk until frothy. Pour this into the bowl with the wet ingredients (nut butter/ maple syrup) and whisk its all combined
  6. Chop the dates and the chocolate into chunks and add into the mixture (or any other fillings you like) and stir to combine.
  7. Taking a heaped tablespoon of mixture, dollop it onto the baking paper or silicon mat. Leave about half an inch between each cookie as they spread slightly when cooking. If its really gooey - use your finger to gently slide the mixture off the spon!
  8. Place in the oven near the top shelf and cook for 15 - 20 minutes or until brown.
  9. Remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack. The cookies will still be soft whilst hot so be careful when transferring them to the cooling rack (I used a spatula). If you use baking paper transfer the cookies on the paper onto the cooling rack and allow them to fully cool before using a spatula to lift them from the paper.
  10. If you manage not to scoff them all at once, you can keep the remaining cookies in the fridge for 3-4 days.
Recipe Notes

Substitutions

For AIP cookies you can use tigernut flour and tigernut butter in place of the nut flour/butter.

If you are following a SIBO Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) then you will need to omit the bicarbonate of soda and use honey instead of maple syrup. I would suggest only using 2 tablespoons as honey is quite sweet.

For Whole30 omit the maple syrup and add 2 extra tablespoons of coconut milk.

For Ketogenic/ Low Carb substitute the maple syrup with erythritol and add 2 tablespoons of extra coconut milk.

What is a SIBO Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD)?

What is a SIBO Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD)?

What is SIBO?

In short SIBO stands for Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth. It’s a gastrointestinal disorder that occurs when there are excessive bacteria in the small intestine. For more details and a list of symptoms please read my post “SIBO – A Basic Guide”.

A SIBO Specific Carbohydrate Diet is a combination of a SCD diet and a low FODMAP diet.

A Specific Carbohydrate Diet or SCD for short, is a way of eating developed by the biochemist and biologist Elaine Gottschall. Elaine developed the diet to help manage the symptoms of Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, chronic diarrhoea, colitis, cystic fibrosis and diverticulitis.

FODMAP is an acronym that stands for Fermentable, Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. They are all forms of carbohydrates that absorb water in the small intestines and pass through to the large intestine where they rapidly ferment as naturally occurring bacteria consume them. This fermentation process releases gas, and it’s this combined with the excess water that causes abdominal pain, discomfort, flatulence, bloating and many other gastrointestinal symptoms related to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO). When a person follows a Low FODMAP diet they aim to eat foods that are low in these types of carbohydrates. For more details please read my post “Low FODMAP – A basic guide”.

What is a SIBO SCD diet used for?

It may seem like a silly question but the SIBO SCD can actually be used for a number of gastrointestinal disorders, not just SIBO as the name suggests. IBS, ulcerative colitis, crohn’s disease, celiac disease, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) to name a few, can all benefit from following this diet.

How it works

People who suffer with IBS, SIBO and other gut issues tend to find it difficult to break down complex carbohydrates such as starchy and sugary foods. This leads to food being undigested in the gut allowing bacteria and yeast to feed off it, leading to bacterial and yeast overgrowths (an unbalanced intestinal flora). This goes on to cause a chain reaction of excess toxins and acids which can cause irritation, damages cells and stops food from absorbing properly.

By eating foods that are easily digested, it means the body is able to process/ digest it properly; therefore bacteria and yeast are not able to feed from it. This can help to rebalance the intestinal flora, reduce inflammation and allow the right digestion processes to occur. As the gut begins to heal and functions better, symptoms are reduced and in some cases can be completely healed.

The basics; what you can and can’t eat

The idea is to avoid starchy foods, eat low fibre and low fermentable fruits and vegetables. Be conscious of portion sizing, don’t eat any raw foods for the initial interim period and wait 4 hours between meals (Ideally 5 hours but this can be tricky for people who might work shifts etc, so 4 hours is acceptable).

There are a number of useful websites that list the types of SCD foods that you can/ can’t eat as well as low to high FODMAPs. Just remember that a SIBO SCD is a combination of BOTH these diets so if you are looking at a low FODMAP list, there may be foods on there that are NOT SCD allowed. It’s the same with SCD lists; you will need to cross reference them with a FODMAP list.

The top website listed below, has a list that is SIBO SCD foods– a combination of SCD and FODMAPS. It may help if you print this off.

SIBO Diet Recipes – this website has a SIBO SCD allowed/not allowed foods AND FODMAP list. That means that you won’t need to check it against a FODMAP list.

Dr Axe

Breaking the Vicious Cycle has a FULL A-Z list of SCD foods

Health Through Diet has a SCD foods list

Eat
Foods to eat include meat* and fish, fats, lactose free dairy, nuts, seeds, allowed fruit and vegetables and other ‘legal’ items.
*not including bacon, chorizo, sausages or meats that will have other ingredients in.

Avoid
Foods to avoid include all grains (including quinoa and oats), all sugars, soy, tubers (arrowroot, parsnips, tapioca) no gums or thickeners such as carrageen or guar gum, no garlic or onions, no mucilaginous foods such as flaxseed, chia, aloe or astragalus.

Where to start

There are two elements to the diet the first part is the SCD side, where foods are split into ‘illegal’ and ‘legal’ food groups. You need to remove all the foods from your diet that fall into the ‘illegal’ category. These foods will remain the same no matter how long you have been on the diet.

However, the second part of the diet – the FODMAPs change after you have been on the diet for some time and you are feeling the benefits (e.g. are symptom free).

FODMAPs are split into three categories – low, moderate and high. When you start the diet you will be eating all the foods in the low category. Some foods are considered low FODMAP if you eat a small portion, but if you eat more than the recommended portion size it can fall into the moderate category. For example 1 cup of cabbage is considered low FODMAP, whereas more than one cup will be considered moderate FODMAP.

Once you have adapted to eating SIBO SCD and are feeling better you can start to re-introduce or increase some of the FODMAP foods, by eating from the moderate category.

It can take time to re-introduce or increase foods, as it’s possible that you may react to some of them. You need to reintroduce one food item at a time so that you can monitor your response to them. Start with a very small portion and if you feel ok eating it (e.g. have no symptoms such as flatulence and bloating) then next time try increasing the portion size.

If you do notice your symptoms flaring after reintroducing a FODMAP then you need to discontinue this food and mark it down as one of the foods you don’t tolerate. If you notice your symptoms flare only after eating the larger portion size then make a note of the amount you were able to eat without any issues.

Many of the websites I have read suggest two weeks as the initial period (the time before you can start to reintroduce foods). However I would say 2 weeks as a minimum and see how you feel. If, like me, you have serious chronic health issues, it can take your body a lot longer to adjust/ respond to things.

My Story

If you have been following me for some time you will know that I’m not new to the world of elimination diets. In 2013 my private specialist doctor recommended a Stone Age diet (eating clean, unprocessed foods) to help manage my symptoms of Myalgic Encephalopathy. In 2014 she also recommended I follow a ketogenic diet – combining it with Stone Age eating. The idea was that by eating clean, I was able to avoid chemicals, preservatives and additives in foods, which can stress the body and digestive system. By adding in the ketogenic diet I was able to push my body into using fat a fuel, which can help with mitochondrial function as well as my gut issues.
After antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease my gut issues got worse and the NHS just confirmed the IBS label I had already been given (I had private testing that confirmed I had SIBO).
In 2016 I embarked upon an Auto Immune Protocol (AIP) diet to help identify foods that I was sensitive to. I combined this with a Low FODMAP diet which is recommended for IBS. I found combining these ways of eating with the ketogenic aspect to be incredibly complicated and quite stressful, so I ditched being ketogenic and focused on just being low carb.

I’ve found AIP and Low FODMAP incredibly helpful in identifying some of the foods that I am sensitive to, and it’s helped reduce my symptoms massively. However I’ve struggled with reintroductions – finding that some days, I react to foods and other days having no reaction. I got really fed up and frustrated and felt like I needed to go back to the drawing board and start again.

Originally when I first looked at diets specific to SIBO, I had bookmarked a few websites for the SIBO Specific Carbohydrate Diet. I decided to have another read through and seeing that it had a 75% chance of improvement (1), I felt it was the best next step for me.

I will still have to remain AIP for the mean time, as it takes time to reintroduce foods, but my aim is to add in all the foods that are on a ‘NO’ AIP list, that are compliant with a SIBO SCD.
If you want to know more about my health and the diets I have been using to help manage my symptoms then take a look at the following posts. You can also follow me on Instagram and Facebook.

Tips

Food Diary – I recommend a food diary because it can really make the difference in spotting if you respond to something. I’ve been following a variety of elimination diets for a while now and I have been terrible at keeping a food diary (i.e. haven’t logged a thing – eeek!). I recently decided I needed to get a better grip of things and purchased a Low FODMAP diary from amazon. It’s been a life changer, helping me to recognise when I react to foods. The book I purchased (2) was £4.99 but you could easily buy a plain note pad from a pound store and use that instead. You just need to note down what time you eat, what you eat and whether any symptoms arise after eating it. It also helps to note down bowel movements, water intake, and stress levels.

The Four Dark Horsemen (3) – The SCD lifestyle website suggests that there are four possible ‘bad guys’ that are the reason you may not see any improvement on the SIBO SCD. They are listed as Dairy, Eggs, Nuts and Excessive fruit/ honey.

These are all foods that I have already eliminated on the AIP diet and am still slowly working on reintroducing them (eggs and nuts only). I would recommend eliminating them when you start the SIBO SCD diet and get it out the way. I say this because you may be surprised to find out that you react to them when you later reintroduce. Through the AIP diet I have discovered a number of foods that I react to that I would have sworn I would be fine eating! It gets easier to recognise flare ups or reactions when you have been symptom free for a while.

Timings – It’s recommended that you leave 5 hours (although 4 hours is acceptable) between meals and the reason for this is so that it gives the gut a chance to digest your meal and have what’s known as a ‘housekeeping wave’ (4).

The intestine has two modes that it can be in – either an eating mode (which is self-explanatory) or cleaning mode (housekeeping wave) which is when it cleans up and empties into the colon. A housekeeping wave occurs every 90 minutes and is a strong repetitive motion (like a wave) that pushes leftover indigestible material into the colon. However if you are always eating and snacking, the intestine will be constantly in eating mode and indigestible materials will be left to ferment and be snacked on by bacteria!

Meal Planning It might be a struggle to eat meals with such a large time gap, especially for those who may have set work breaks or those who may eat at certain times (e.g. with children after school).

As a result I highly recommend doing a bit of meal planning, so that you are able to leave enough time between meals to allow for a cleaning wave. For example, it might help to work backwards if you know that you need to eat your last meal at 6pm. This would mean that you would have lunch at 1pm and your breakfast at 8am.

Whatever way round you work it, it helps to plan what meals you eat each week – including breakfast choices because it means you won’t have to spend time faffing and trying to decide what to eat (which often leads to snacking or picking!).

It helps to find a few recipes and get the ingredients in that you need to make them, before you start the diet. That way you are less likely to fall off the waggon or cheat.
I will include a list of websites with recipes on so that you can take a look. Just remember that some of the recipes will be for when you have reintroduced foods, especially desserts that may use honey to sweeten them.

Websites

The websites listed below are good for information, lists, recipes and other useful resources (such as useful supplements and testing etc). The first two websites are also listed above, but these links take you to the recipe sections.

SIBO Diet Recipes
Dr Axe
The Healthy Gut
Bridgetown Nutrition
SCD Lifestyle
My SIBO Recipes

Final Note

If you have found this information useful or want to add anything that you think will help others, please comment below. I always appreciate feedback and additional information – it not only helps me, but it helps other readers too.

Referencing

(1) The Vicious Cycle – Elain Gottschall; http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/p/about-the-diet/

(2) Amazon – Low FODMAP Food Diary – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Low-FODMAP-Food-Diary-Digestive/dp/1911492055/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1498658576&sr=8-1&keywords=fodmap+diary

(3) The Four Dark Horsemen – SCD Lifestyle; http://scdlifestyle.com/2011/03/what-to-do-when-the-scd-diet-isnt-working/

(4) Cedars Sinai Medical Centre – Low Fermentation / SIBO diet; http://www.siboinfo.com/handouts.html

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AIP diet Meatballs – Low FODMAP & Low Carb

AIP Meatballs served with a side salad, some avocado and AIP coleslaw.

This recipe is AIP diet, low carb and Low FODMAP compliant. I tweaked a recipe I came across for Chicken Piccata Meatballs. I’m not sure what the original dish was meant to taste like so as a result I have decided to call it meatballs.

I have made this dish using a variety of AIP, low FODMAP and low carb ingredients, depending on what I have available in my fridge. It tastes great with pork mince and chicken mince. I have made the ‘noodles’ using julienne peeled carrots, swede and courgette. My favourite is a mixture of courgettes and carrot. Pork rinds (crushed with a rolling pin or blitzed in the blender) or arrowroot flour work well to bind the meatballs. However if you don’t have rinds or arrowroot, you can still make the meatballs. Just be sure to roll the balls firmly to ensure they stay together

Alternative Serving Suggestion for AIP Chicken Meatballs

You can serve these AIP, low FODMAP and low carb meatballs without the sauce and noodles. They taste great with a side salad, some avocado and some AIP coleslaw.

Chicken Meatballs

Servings: 4 (Makes 4 servings)

Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Carbs 11.1 grams

Fiber 3.1 grams

Net carbs 8 grams

Protein 32.8 grams

Fat 21 grams

Calories 366 Kcals

If you like this recipe then check out my other AIP, low FODMAP and low carb recipes such as my Salmon fishcakes recipe.

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AIP Chicken Meatballs - low FODMAP & low carb
Course Main Dish
Cuisine English
Servings
(16 Meatballs)
Ingredients
Meatballs
Sauce
Noodles
  • 1 large courgette julienne peeled / spiralized
  • 2 medium Carrot julienne peeled / spiralized
Course Main Dish
Cuisine English
Servings
(16 Meatballs)
Ingredients
Meatballs
Sauce
Noodles
  • 1 large courgette julienne peeled / spiralized
  • 2 medium Carrot julienne peeled / spiralized
Instructions
Make the meatballs
  1. Preheat the oven to 200'C.
  2. Finely chop the spring onion tops and garlic leaves and place them into a mixing bowl.
  3. If using pork rinds you need to grind them down. You can do this buy blitzing them in the blender or placing them into a food bag and bashing/ rolling with a rolling pin until they resemble biscuit crumbs.
  4. Add the ground rind to the mixing bowl with the spring onion tops and garlic leaves. If using arrowroot flour add in here. Add in the salt, sage, black pepper (if using), parsley and marjoram. Stir to combine.
  5. Add the mince meat and either using a spoon or your hands, combine until the seasoning is mixed into the meat.
  6. Take 1- 1 1/2 tablespoons of the mixture and roll into balls. Place on a plate ready to fry.
Make the 'noodles'
  1. Using a julienne peeler or a spiralizer, make your chosen vegetables into noodles. Place on a plate ready to cook.
Cooking the noodles and sauce
  1. Over a medium heat in a medium pan melt the coconut oil.
  2. When the oil is hot, carefully add in the meatballs in small batches of 5 at a time. Allow to cook on each side for 1-2 minutes (or until brown).
  3. When the meatballs are browned, transfer to a baking tray or dish ready to place in the oven.
  4. Place the tray of meatballs in the oven for 16- 22 minutes
cook the 'noodles' and sauce
  1. In a large pan over a low heat add a splash of coconut milk and add in the 'noodles', the garlic leaves and spring onion tops.
  2. Add in the bone broth (or water) and the rest of the seasoning/ ingredients.
  3. Allow to simmer slowly stirring regularly.
  4. When the meatballs have 5 minutes leaf, turn up the heat to high and add the remaining coconut milk.
  5. As the sauce cooks, it will reduce down leaving you with a thicker sauce. If you want to make the sauce thinner add in more bone broth or coconut milk or water.
  6. When the meatballs have cooked, dish up the noodles on to four plates, add a few meatballs on top and drizzle over some of the sauce.
Recipe Notes

If using arrowroot flour in place of the pork rinds, use 2 - 3 tablespoons.

AIP diet Lamb Curry – Low FODMAP and Ketogenic

A flavourful lamb curry with a gentle heat, suitable for those following the AIP diet. Also suitable for a low FODMAP diet and a low carb diet.

This lamb curry has a lot of flavour and depth to it which can often be lacking in AIP diet recipes. It uses fried grated swede as it gives a really subtle almost caramelised taste, similar to browned onions. It also works well with parsnip if you don’t have any swede. If you wanted to skip adding in the swede you can but it really does add a lot of flavour to the dish.

This dish can be made with beef or lamb, I have tried both. For the beef option I used a combination of beef skirt and diced beef steak.

Cooking Appliances

I cooked this in my Sage Fast Slow Pro machine, using the pressure cooker option. It can be cooked in a slow cooker, a pressure cooker or in an oven proof dish.

Servings: 4

Nutritional Information (per serving*)

Total Carbs 9.9 grams

Fiber 2.2 grams

Net carbs 7.7 grams

Protein 43 grams

Fat 64 grams

Calories 790 Kcals

*Approximate

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AIP diet Lamb Curry - Low FODMAP and Ketogenic
A flavourful lamb curry with a gentle heat and spice. it delicious served with swede rice or simply on its own.
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 20
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 20
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
Prepare the swede
  1. Start by preparing the swede. Peel the skin from the swede and cut into thick slices (this makes it easier to old when grating). Grate the slices of swede into a bowl.
  2. In a large frying pan add 2 tbsp of oil. Once the oil is hot add in the swede and allow to fry for a few minutes before stirring.
  3. Regularly stir the swede so that it does'nt burn or stick. It will turn a brown colour which is what you want.
  4. Once all of the swede has turned a brown colour remove it from the pan and place it aside ready to add into the curry later.
Prepare the curry
  1. Chop the spring onion, leek tops and garlic leaves into small pieces.
  2. Grate one of the carrots and the ginger into a bowl.
  3. Dice the remaining carrot and chop the coriander leaves roughly.
  4. In a pan brown the meat on all sides then transfer to a large oven proof dish or to a pressure cooker or slow cooker.
  5. Add to the meat the fried swede, the leek and onion tops, the garlic leaves, tamarind, carrots, bone broth, lemon juice , coriander, ginger and coconut milk and stir to combine.
  6. For pressure cookers, cook for 40 minutes on 80 k/w pressure. For slow cookers cook for 6 hours on low. For ovens cook at 200'c for 1 hour.
  7. Once cooked, if the sauce is not thick enough you can reduce it by cooking on a low flame for about 10 minutes. You would need to transfer the curry to a large frying pan. If you have an InstaPot or Sage Fast pro slow pot, you can reduce the liquid by turning the dial to 'reduce', on high for 10 minutes.
Recipe Notes

AIP Reintroductions

I follow an AIP diet but over the last few months I have been reintroducing various items back into my diet. As a result I now make this recipe with a few extra added ingredients. If you are able to tolerate them, consider adding in the following ingredients :-

1 Tbsp Garam masala
1-2 tsp Black pepper
1 tsp of potato starch (mixed into 4 tbsp of cold water) - this helps thicken up the sauce

AIP Diet Yuk Sung Recipe (Spicy Minced Pork) – Low FODMAP & Ketogenic

As a child I enjoyed eating Yuk Sung from the local Chinese take away. It was a slightly spicy minced pork dish that was served in a lettuce leaf and topped with little pieces of crunchy prawn cracker. I don’t know what’s in the original recipe but I have decided to call this AIP diet version by the same name because it reminds me of it so much.

I have tried making this recipe with minced pork as well as minced beef and both tasted the same. Ideally you want to serve in an iceberg lettuce leaf as it really enhances the flavour, when I tried it with other lettuce varieties it just didn’t taste the same.

Although the recipe is listed as two servings but I usually get three servings from mine. When serving, I dont add any sides, so if you serve the dish with side dishes you could easily get four servings from it.

Yuk Sung

Servings: 2

Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Carbs 13.1 grams

Fiber 3.2 grams

Net carbs 9.9 grams

Protein 55.5 grams

Fat 25.2 grams

Calories 490 Kcals

(Three servings = Total carbs 8.7g, fiber 2.1g, net carbs 6.6g, protein 37g, fat 16.8g and calories 327)

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AIP style Yuk Sung
An AIP version of the Chinese take away dish Yuk Sung. Sweet and spicy minced pork with ginger, served in an Iceberg lettuce leaf.
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Chinese
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 45
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Chinese
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 45
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
Prepare the lettuce leaves
  1. Carefully remove the leaves from the lettuce once by one, peeling gently so that each leaf stays in one piece.
  2. Taking one leaf a time, gently shake off any excess water and place on a towel or some kitchen paper to allow them to dry.
  3. Place a few leaves at a time into a sieve, wash gently under a running tap.
Cooking instructions
  1. In a pan heat the coconut oil over a medium heat.
  2. Add in the mince and allow to brown.
  3. Add in the carrots (included grated), ginger, spring onion tops, and half the bone broth. Stir to combine the ingredients.
  4. Add in the tamarind, ginger and apple cider vinegar and stir again.
  5. Cover with a lid and allow to simmer for 15- 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  6. If the bone broth starts to reduce, add in the rest of the bone broth. Once the meat has cooked through taste; if desired you can add in extra sweetener.
  7. When ready, serve straight from the pan – scooping small amounts into lettuce cups and eating like you would a tortilla wrap. Ensure there are plenty of kitchen towels on hand as it can get a little messy!