Paleo Sweet Pulled Pork

This is another recipe that I feel kind of bad about calling a recipe because it’s not really difficult or something that someone couldn’t fathom out for them self! However I am sharing it as it would be useful to those who are new to paleo; When you make the switch eating this way it can be really daunting especially if a person is used to jar marinades and sauces. This ‘recipe’ should take the guess-work out and give you the building blocks to cooking paleo and low carb.

Sweeteners
If you are not low carb, then you could easily switch the erythritol for another type of sweetener or even use honey. You will need to reduce the amounts though as erythritol isn’t that sweet so I would suggest halving the sweetener if using honey or sugar and maybe reducing by 1/4 if using xylitol or coconut sugar.

Macros

The macros are based on 8 servings but it will depend on the amount of meat used. I forgot to make a note of the size of my joint but as it was in my meat box (From The Well Hung Meat Company) I know it was about 1.8kg!

Seasoning with Meat
Total Carbs 1.1g
Fiber 0.19g
Net Carbs 0.95g
Protein 39.2g
Fat 42.6g
Kcals 556

Seasoning Only – 8 Servings
Total Carbs 1.1g
Fiber 0.19g
Net Carbs 0.95g
Protein 0.45g
Fat 2g
Kcals 23.9

Serving Suggestions
Want something to serve this with then take a look at my coleslaw recipe or for sauces and dips you could serve it with dairy free tzatziki or spicy sriracha mayo!

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Paleo Sweet Pulled Pork
This sweet and flavourful pulled pork is seasoned enough to give it a subtle flavour without being too sickly sweet. If you wanted an extra kick then add in a little more cayenne pepper and a pinch of chilli flakes!
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time 6 Hours
Servings
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time 6 Hours
Servings
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl combine 1 tsp of salt, the oregano, the cayenne pepper, erythritol, the chopped sage, and the olive oil. Stir to combine.
  2. Using a sharp knife, carefully poke a few holes all over the joint. Then peel and slice the garlic into slithers. Poke slithers of the garlic into the holes in the meat, pushing the garlic in until it can't be seen.
  3. Using your hands rub the seasoning mix over the meat focusing on the top part of the joint (the fatty bit).
  4. Place the meat in the slow cooker with the fat side down. Pour in the bone broth. (I used frozen cubes of bone broth)
  5. Leave the slow cooker on low and cook for about 6 hours. Alternatively turn on high and cook for 4 hours. If you want to make the crackling to serve at the same time as the meat then go to number 7 and then follow the instructions for the crackling (listed below) - taking the fat out of the slow cooker 1 hour before the meat is done.
  6. When the slow cooker has finished (High 4 hours/ low 6 hours), using oven gloves take the dish out of the slow cooker and place on a chopping board or heat safe surface.
  7. Turn the meat around (be careful as it will be hot) and using tongs peel off the top layer of fat and place on a small baking tray fatty side down. Sprinkle with the remaining 1 tsp of salt
  8. Take two forks and carefully pull the meat apart, until it is all shredded then stir about so that any sauce in the bottom of the dish gets evenly distributed over the meat. Serve with some salad and coleslaw or in a paleo wrap with guacamole - yum!
Making the Crackling
  1. Heat the oven to 220'C (428'F) or as high as you can.
  2. Place the baking tray with the fat on into the oven and cook for about 30-40 minutes.
  3. When it is ready take out the oven and allow to cool. When cool enough to handle cut into strips using meat scissors or a sharp knife.
  4. Serve on the side with the pulled pork or keep in an air tight container in the fridge to munch on when you want!
Recipe Notes

The pulled pork will last in the fridge for about 3 days. If you wanted to you could dish up into freezable containers and freeze. When ready to use, defrost in the fridge over night and reheat until piping hot in the oven or microwave.

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Paleo Somerset Pork with Sausages

I’m actually quite excited to be sharing this recipe with you because it came about from a bit of a mix up and a wing it job! I had been talking to my mum about cooking and she mentioned a particular dish known as Somerset pork that she cooks for my granddad, however she uses a packet recipe. I remember eating it as a child and thought it would be great to make with the sausage that I had from my new meat box from The Well Hung Meat Company.

I went away to look on the Internet to see what this recipe was meant to be made with and discovered that it was made with pork loin or pork belly draft – doh! By this point I had already taken the two bags of sausages out of the freezer so it had to go ahead!

Many of the recipes that I looked at had similarities such as they all contained apple or apple sauce, many of them contained sage and most of them contained onions and garlic. I decided that these would be my main ingredients and then the rest I would tweak as I went along. I decided to include cider in this recipe as it was going to be eaten by my husband, however if you are going to be making low-carb you would probably want to omit the alcohol altogether. If you want to make it non-alcoholic then you could use apple juice instead.

I made this recipe mainly in a slow cooker but I did fry the onions first in order to give them a little bit of a caramelised taste and I also browned the sausages as I found it gave a much better colour and appearance to the dish. However if you wanted to you could always just chuck everything into the slow cooker and leave it to cook and just have the dish like that or, you could brown the sausages after the slow cooker has done its thing. If you do decide to brown the sausages I would say to do this last (after the slow cooker has done its magic) simply because I tried both methods; I browned half the sausages first before putting them in to the slow cooker, and half afterwards. I found that they kept their colour if browned last and had a much more appetizing look about them (but the choice is yours).

The sausages that I used for this dish were from The Well Hung Meat Company and there were two different flavours. One was just a plain sausage and the other was pork and leek and were not grain/ gluten-free (as it was for Mr Noodles). However in order to make this recipe 100% paleo you would want to use paleo friendly sausages, or even consider making your own. I personally would use Heck plain sausages as they are 97% pork; the reason for this is because many other brands / meat boxes companies still use yeast, gluten-free flour, rice flour or oats and I don’t tolerate these ingredients.

Cooking Methods
If you don’t have a slow cooker you can easily make this in the oven or on the stove top in a large dish, however the cooking times would vary and it would me you can’t leave it cooking while you go out to work. I should also point out that although the recipe states it takes 4 hours to cook, it can take a lot less time or a lot longer depending on your slow cooked options. I cooked this dish on a high temperature and left it for just over 3 hours. It was cooked and ready to eat an hour after being left in the slow cooker, but I left it to let the flavours infuse. If you were out at work you would want to leave it on the lowest temperature so that it takes its time to cook.

Vegetarian Option
I have tagged this recipe as vegetarian as it would be easy to make using vegetarian sausages, you would also need to swap the bone broth for vegetable stock.

Whole30
To make this recipe whole30 compliant then omit the alcohol. You can use apple juice to sweeten (as juice is allowed on the whole30 program as a sweetener), but the apple in this recipe should be enough to give it that Apple/ sweet flavour. You would also need to omit the tomato purée too and use about 5 small cherry tomatoes instead.

Macros
If you want to make this dish low carb/ ketogenic then leave out the alcohol; It will taste just as nice but wont have all those empty carbs. For your convenience I have listed the macros for the dish below for with and without alcohol. Both are based on making 4 servings.

With Alcohol
Total Carbs 16.9g
Fiber 2.6g
Net Carbs 14.3g
Protein 36.2
Fat 50.1g
Kcals 665

Without alcohol
Total Carbs 13g
Fiber 2.6g
Net Carbs 10.4g
Protein 35.9g
Fat 50.9g
Kcals 633

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Print Recipe
Paleo Somerset Pork with Sausages
Course Main Dish
Cuisine English
Cook Time 4 Hours
Servings
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine English
Cook Time 4 Hours
Servings
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
Browning the Sausages / Onions
  1. Gently heat the coconut oil over a low heat. Peel then dice the onions and add to the pan; allow to cook until really brown. This will give them a much sweeter taste and add flavour to the dish. You can omit this bit - its entirely up to you. It should take about 8 minutes.
  2. When the onions are cooked remove them from the pan and keep them aside for later. Add the sausages to the used pan and add in the olive oil. Cook the sausages until they are very brown on all sides (about 6 minutes).
  3. Place the browned onions and sausages in the slow cooker or in the dish/pan you are going to cook in.
Oven Cooking
  1. If you are cooking this in the oven then turn your cooker to 180' ready to warm up.
  2. Brown the onions and then the sausages as above. When the sausages are browned turn up to a medium heat, add the onions back in, add in the chopped garlic, meat stock and allow to cook for 5 minutes or so until hot bubbling.
  3. Add in the cider (or apple juice), the lemon zest, the Dijon mustard, the sage, parsley, paprika, cayenne and stir to combine. Allow to cook for about 20 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse.
  4. Taste the sauce and if you desire add in extra mustard and seasoning. Add in the tablespoon of tomato puree, stir to combine. If you want to serve the dish soon then allow it to simmer for a further 10 minutes before adding in the coconut milk then serving.
  5. If you want to dish to slow cook, then leave on the stove top in a pan on very low and cook for another hour or so. Keep checking to ensure it doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. (cover with a lid)
  6. For oven cooking cover with a lid and place in the center of the oven and allow to cook for a further - 2 hours.
  7. When the dish is cooked, add in the coconut milk and stir to combine then its ready to serve!
Slow Cooker Method
  1. If browning the onions and sausages - follow the instructions above before placing in the slow cooker.
  2. Add in (except the coconut oil, olive oil and coconut milk) all of the ingredients and stir.
  3. Cover with a lid and allow the slow cooker to do its thing - If setting to high the dish will take about 3-4 hours to cook. If set to low allow at least 6 hours to cook.
  4. When cooked If you want to brown the sausages, remove them from the slow cooker using tongs. Heat the olive oil in a pan and add the sausages in - cooking until brown on all sides. Return back to the slow cooker when done.
  5. Stir in the coconut milk and its ready to serve!
Recipe Notes

This dish is freezable, so you can easily make a large batch of this recipe and dish it up into freezer tubs. I would suggest keeping them in the freezer for no longer than 3 months. When you want to eat it, fetch the dish out of the freezer the day before and allow to defrost in the fridge. Re heat until piping hot either in the oven or in the microwave.

Baked Salmon

This is such a simple recipe to make and easy to adapt; If you dont like salmon you can sub for another type of filleted fish. If you dont like spicy food, then just alter the amount of paprika, chill and dijon mustard that you use. If you like onions – no problem, add as much as you like! It would be easy to make this recipe in the slow cooker, I would marinate it over night then cook on low for 6 – 8* hours  or cook on high for 4 hours*.

To slow cook, add all the marinade/ juices into the bowl with all the sauce ingredients and leave it to cook/ infuse. Keep an eye on it to check it wont burn and if the sauce reduces, add in an extra 1/2 cup of coconut milk 30 minutes before serving.

(*Check your manufacturer settings)

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Baked Salmon
Baked Salmon in a creamy dairy-free sauce, perfect served with sweet potato mash, roasted or steamed veg.
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 5 Min
Cook Time 40 Min
Servings
Ingredients
  • 2 Fillets salmon (or Other Fish)
  • 2 Slices Lemon Optional - For Garnish
Marinade
Sauce
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 5 Min
Cook Time 40 Min
Servings
Ingredients
  • 2 Fillets salmon (or Other Fish)
  • 2 Slices Lemon Optional - For Garnish
Marinade
Sauce
Instructions
Marinate the Fish
  1. In a bowl combine all of the marinade ingredients and give it a good stir.
  2. Wash the fish with a little extra lemon juice and pat dry with a paper towel.
  3. Place the washed fish into the bowl with the marinade (with the skin touching the bottom of the dish). Leave for as long as possible (over night is best)
Cook the Fish
  1. When ready to cook, pre heat the oven to 190'
  2. Place a large piece of foil into a glass dish (you may need to fold two pieces together). Place the fish in the middle of the foil and pour over the marinade - juices and all!
  3. Carefully fold over the top of the foil making like a parcel (so the steam cooks the fish)
  4. Cook for 40 minutes, checking every now and again. To keep moist you can use a small ladle or baster to gather up the juices and pour over the fish.
  5. Start preparing the sauce when you have approx 10-12 minutes to go.
  6. Once the fish is cooked you can serve with or without its juices.
Make the Sauce
  1. (Pre heat an oven ring - high heat) Peel and crush 2 garlic cloves and add to a small pan.
  2. Add coconut milk, Dijon mustard, dill and a dash of salt and pepper.
  3. Place on the oven ring and heat until it bubbles, then lower the heat and cover with a lid. As the sauce heats it will thicken up a little.
  4. Taste and add more salt and pepper if desired.
  5. Serve on the side in a dish or poured over fish

Paleo Slow Cooker Lamb Curry

Paleo Slow Cooker Lamb Curry

This recipe is so easy to make and can be cooked in a large pan or left in the slow cooker (while you get to sit on the sofa and relax – yay!). The only ‘extra’ prep you’ll need to do if you go with the slow cooker method, is that you need to cook the onions first. Once you do that you can add everything to the slow cooker and leave it to do its thing, but please – whatever you do don’t skip browning the onions. The reason for this is because traditionally in many Indian cuisine, the onions are sautéed until brown as this gives the end dish a much fuller flavour. Be warned! – skipping this stage WILL change the overall taste of the dish.

Although this recipe is pretty much a wing it job, it’s a combination of a new recipe that I found and one of my old favourites. It came about because I wanted to put my new slow cooker to use and make something different with the diced lamb we had in the fridge. Not sure what I wanted to cook I googled ‘paleo lamb slow cooker’ and ‘eat drink paleo‘  lamb curry popped up. Never one to follow a recipe to the full I decided that I would pre cook my onions and it was when they were brown that I decide to add in the spices just to get an idea of the smell (smell is a great indicate of what a dish will taste like). When I smelt it, it reminded me of Priya’s hyderbadi chicken dish, one of my ultimate favourite curries EVER! One aromatic whiff and I decided to add in some of the spices that featured in Priya’s dish along with some nut butter (Priya’s recipe uses fresh nuts ground into a paste). Then I added in the meat – just to give it a good coating (not to pre cook) then poured it all into the slow cooker. In future when cooking it, I’ll probably just marinate the meat in the nut butter and spices overnight (in the fridge) as it helps the flavours to really sink in. I added about 3/4 cup of water and left it to cook for 5 hours on high. An hour before serving, I added in some coconut milk.

Serve on a bed of Cauli rice with a dash of rose-water, a drizzle of coconut cream and a sprinkling of saffron… Heaven!This recipe is so easy to make and can be cooked in a large pan or left in the slow cooker (while you get to sit on the sofa and relax – yay!). The only ‘extra’ prep you’ll need to do if you go with the slow cooker method, is that you need to cook the onions first. Once you do that you can add everything to the slow cooker and leave it to do its thing, but please – whatever you do don’t skip browning the onions. The reason for this is because traditionally in many Indian cuisine, the onions are sautéed until brown as this gives the end dish a much fuller flavour. Be warned! – skipping this stage WILL change the overall taste of the dish.

Although this recipe is pretty much a wing it job, it’s a combination of a new recipe that I found and one of my old favourites. It came about because I wanted to put my new slow cooker to use and make something different with the diced lamb we had in the fridge. Not sure what I wanted to cook I googled ‘paleo lamb slow cooker’ and ‘eat drink paleo‘  lamb curry popped up. Never one to follow a recipe to the full I decided that I would pre cook my onions and it was when they were brown that I decide to add in the spices just to get an idea of the smell (smell is a great indicate of what a dish will taste like). When I smelt it, it reminded me of Priya’s hyderbadi chicken dish, one of my ultimate favourite curries EVER! One aromatic whiff and I decided to add in some of the spices that featured in Priya’s dish along with some nut butter (Priya’s recipe uses fresh nuts ground into a paste). Then I added in the meat – just to give it a good coating (not to pre cook) then poured it all into the slow cooker. In future when cooking it, I’ll probably just marinate the meat in the nut butter and spices overnight (in the fridge) as it helps the flavours to really sink in. I added about 3/4 cup of water and left it to cook for 5 hours on high. An hour before serving, I added in some coconut milk.

Serve on a bed of Cauli rice with a dash of rose-water, a drizzle of coconut cream and a sprinkling of saffron… Heaven!

Macros
This recipe makes 4 servings (and doesn’t include the macros for serving cauli-rice or a naan bread etc). I have listed the macros for both 3 and 4 servings. If you are making this dish to serve with a side such as cauli-rice or a paleo naan, then the recipe suits 4 servings. If you are eating it without a side you may want a bigger serving.

Based on 4 servings
Total Carbs 9.8g
Fiber 3.3g
Net Carbs 6.5g
Protein 31g
Fat 33.2g
Calories 471

Based on 3 servings
Total Carbs 13.1g
Fiber 4.4g
Net Carbs 8.7g
Protein 41.4
Fat 44.3g
Calories 629

As you can see, a larger portion would give you a lot more protein than you may want, if this is the case, you can always take out some of the meat, or make the recipe and use less lamb.

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Paleo Lamb Curry - Slow Cooker Friendly
A fragrant and flavourful curry, not too spicy but not too plain! Best served with cauli rice or paleo tortillas.
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 5 Hours+
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 5 Hours+
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Marinade the lamb in the all of the spices, tomato taste, nut butter and a few drops of water (just to make it all juicy and eaiser to combine).
  2. Start by heating a pan on a medium heat then add a little oil.
  3. Dice the onion then add into the pan, cook for up to 10 minutes, or until they are very brown and soft.
  4. Add the lamb with all of its juices to the onions, give it a good stir to combine then pour into the slow cooker. Add the rest of the water.
  5. Turn the slow cooker on to high and cook for 4 hours. Alternitvely cook on slow (or low) for 8 - 12 hours.
  6. 20 minutes before serving, add the coconut milk, give it a good stir and prepare your cauli rice.
  7. Serve with a dash of rose water, drizzle of coconut milk and sprinkle of garam massala for an authentic garnishing.
Recipe Notes

Suggested Side Dishes:-

Paleo Tortilla Wraps
If you like to eat your curry with a nan bread or roti, then paleo tortillas are a great substitues. I would recommend trying stupid easy paleo tortilla wrap recipe, ive tried it before and it worked really well.

Cauli Rice
If you would rather have a rice side with your curry then check out my simple cauli rice dish here, its super eay to make and you can add in extra spice and onions to give it some added flavour and texture.

Curried Goat

Curried GoatGolden coloured leaves and cool chilly mornings mean one thing! It’s officially autumn! As the days are get shorter and the nights darker, what better way to warm you up than a delicious spicy curry.

Research has shown that a good curry can be beneficial to your health and even help prevent you from getting a cold[1] The reason for this is down to the types of ingredients used. Garlic is said to have cardiovascular, anti-microbia [2] and antibiotic properties [3]. Spices have a number of health benefits, such as cinnamon (found in this recipe in the jerk seasoning) can help a sore throat [4]. These are common everyday ingredients that are top choice in many spicy dishes.

This recipe was given to me by a family friend and is a traditional Caribbean recipe made using goat. If you have never tried goat I would suggest giving it a go as it really is a delicious dish. However it can also be substituted with lamb.

Ingredients
750g Goat (see notes)
2-3 cloves garlic
1 large onion
2 bell peppers (1red/1 green) chopped into very small squares
1tsp Lamb seasoning
1/2 tsp Paprika
1/2 tsp Curry powder
1/2 tsp Garamasala
1/2 tsp Jerk seasoning
Few shakes of hot pepper sauce
Ginger – small chunk – size of an ice cube
1/2 Scotch bonnet (VERY hot pepper)
1 Tin tomatoes
Rice (see notes)
Oxo cube or stock pot or 1-2 cups of bone broth

Notes
To begin, you need to decide how many people you are cooking for to gauge how much meat and rice* you need. For 4 people you would use approx 750g of goat (on the bone), rice should be judged according to the listed cooking instructions.

Scotch bonnet is a very hot pepper and if you’re not good with spicy food you may want to miss this ingredient out. However if you would like to try it, try adding just a small amount (eg 1/4 of a whole scotch bonnet). I will also point out that it’s ideal to wear gloves when preparing the pepper as it can be a nightmare if you handle it then rub your eyes!!!!

When seasoning the meat it can be done the day or night before cooking. The longer the meat is seasoned, the better it will taste. When cooking the meat, keep adding small amounts of water as it will keep the meat moist but will reduce down and make a thick delicious sauce.

*This recipe was created before I went paleo, but it can easily be tweaked to make it paleo friendly. If you do eat rice (some paleo people do) then you can serve it with some (add in some diced onion and some fresh chilli to snazz it up). For an alternative you can make cauliflower rice (see my recipe for cauli rice), again add in some diced onion and chilli to give it some extra flavour.

As noted above you can use either a stock pot or a cup of bone broth instead of a stock cube. This recipe has been made a number of times since I started being paleo and it always varies – sometimes it uses as much as 2 cups of broth, whereas other times just one cup so the best way is to judge it by taste. If you think it needs more, add some in.

Meat if you don’t have any goat or can’t find any , it can be made with some lamb or mutton, ideally use a meat with some bone as it helps add flavour. I recently made this dish using 400g of diced (grass fed) lamb and 800g of ‘scrap end’ which is the neck of mutton/ goat and it turned out beautifully!

This recipe can also be made in a slow cooker! All you need to do is add in all the ingredients (meat, onion, seasoning, stock, peppers, tomatoes) and cook on low for about 8 hours (ideal for days you are out the house all day). You will need to scoop/ drain off any oil that rises to the top before serving.

Method
1. Wash the meat (cold water with lemon or vinegar) then drain. Place in a bowl and add the spices. Rub them into the meat and cover. Place in the fridge for as long as possible for the seasoning to sink in.

2. Cut the onion (1 large per 4 people) into chunks, crush the garlic, cut up the scotch bonnet and the ginger. Add this to the meat.

3. Heat a large pan (or a Dutch pot[5] if you have one (with little or no oil)) And add the meat/ onion mix. Any seasoning left in the bowl, add a little water to collect it and add to the pan.

4. Brown the meat slowly (10 min approx), when the pan gets dry add water and keep adding, bit by bit. This will help to make a sauce.

5. Once the meat is cooked turn down the heat, add the bell peppers, a pint of water, and cook slowly on a low heat. Ensure you keep checking the meat, if needed, add more water (a bit at a time), this will help keep the meat from drying out. Cook for as long as possible (1-2 hours). The longer it cooks for the better it will taste, ideally the meat should be falling off the bone before you even think about serving it up!

6. After at LEAST 2 hours, skim off any oil that has risen to the top then add the tinned tomatoes. Continue to cook on low.

7. Cook rice according to packet details.

8. Just before the rice is cooked (5 mins before) add a stock cube to the the meat. Then when the rice is ready drain the rice and serve with the meat on top.

Please be careful as the bones will have separated from the meat!!!

Links
[1] Curry linked to cold cure

[2] Spices to help the immune system A study conducted by Dr. Ellen Tattelman, an assistant professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, New York.

[3] “Garlic: A natural antibiotic”. ACM Modern Drug Discovery April 2002 Vol. 5, No. 4, p 12. 2002-04-01. Retrieved 2010-08-23.

[4] Health benefits of cinnamon

[5] What is a Dutch pot? Sometimes called a Dutchie, It is any large, heavy pot with a snug fitting lid used for stovetop cooking. Traditionally used in Caribbean cooking, these hard-working heavy pots are perfect for slow-simmered soups and braises.

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